Andrew Gavin Marshall

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Research for Revolution


Research for Revolution

3 March 2014

By: Andrew Gavin Marshall

After a nearly two-month break from work, I have returned full-force to working on The People’s Book Project, a crowd-funded project which has been ongoing (off and on) for the past two-plus years. The Project raises funds to subsidize my research and writing of a series of books examining the ideas, institutions and individuals of power in our world – through historical, political, economic and social realms – as well as the methods and movements of resistance against these power structures. With literally thousands of pages of compiled research thus far, I am pushing forward to finish the current areas of research I have been focused on, as well as moving to complete the first volume of what will doubtlessly be a series of books examining these inter-connected subjects.

So what have I been researching? In the past two weeks, I have been working nearly 12 hours per day collecting research and documentation to contribute to the first volume of the People’s Book Project, focused largely on understanding the global economic, financial and monetary order which is so influential in determining the course of the world and human society, with profound effects upon all the people and life within the world. The aim of my writing, and specifically the People’s Book Project, is to reach a wider and newer audience of people, by attempting to break-down complex institutions and ideologies into more easily-understood concepts; not to ‘dumb-down’ of simplify, but to explain in more simple language. The method of doing this is based primarily upon an understanding – as articulated by George Orwell in his 1946 essay, ‘Politics and the English Language’ – of “political language” as being used to obscure, deflect and manipulate a meaningful understanding of words, concepts, reality and power structures.

In the realm of economics, finance and monetary issues, the uses of “political language” are paramount. Ever read the financial press – Bloomberg, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Barron’s, Forbes, The Banker, etc. – and wonder what the hell these people are talking about? Or why it matters – or should matter – to you? The language is technical, written for “professionals” or “specialists” who received proper educational training in their respective fields, not to be understood by plebian observers, or the “bewildered herd of ignorant and meddlesome outsiders” (as Walter Lippmann referred to the public). The concepts, terms, and institutions within finance, economics and monetary fields are overwhelming in their sheer numbers, let alone meanings, with everything from – collateralized debt obligations, securities markets, bond markets, equity, asset management, money managers, exchange traded funds, price control and stability, macroeconomic adjustments, and the usual alphabet-soups of bungled terminology. It’s a bit much for those who didn’t get degrees in finance or economics.

But then, I didn’t get those degrees either, let alone, any degree. But one thing I do know how to do, and do well, is research. With a sizeable personal library of books – largely research or academic-based – as a start, I have compiled immense amounts of academic journal articles, and have been scouring the financial press for several months, collecting information, quotes and sources from the same publications that are read by those who work within and on top of the world of economics, finance and monetary policy, from the more commonly-known publications like the Wall Street Journal and the Economist, to the most-respected publications like the Financial Times, to the more-specific press, like The Banker, Central Banking, and Barron’s, which pander to audiences firmly resting in the world’s top 1%. On top of this, I have been collecting information from major reports within the industry itself, reviewing articles, forecasts, trends and annual reports and other publications from major banks, international financial institutions, global consulting and advisory firms, prominent lobbies, interest groups, think tanks and foundations. Drawing from a very wide range of sources, most of which are actually supportive – ideologically or institutionally – of the global economic order that rules this world, as well as a host of academic critiques, I have managed to compile – and am still compiling – a truly impressive electronic library of information.

It is from this library that I will be reviewing, organizing and editing into the first (and presumably following) volumes of The People’s Book Project, aiming to help others understand the true nature of the global economic order, and why it is necessary for the survival of the species that we oppose, undermine the legitimacy of – and create an entirely new – global economic system. I hope to analyze this system using language that is approachable and understandable to most people, not just “professionals” and “specialists” (of which I am certainly not one!). This has proven to be a much harder task than I imagined. With each new term, institution or idea described in some obscure economic language, I attempt to discover its true meaning, by holding to the method of translating political language: look at the policies, not the word; look at the actual effects of those policies, not the rhetoric of the “desired effects” they were intended to create; and, if the result of the policy is different from the stated-intent, yet, the policy never changes, one can assume that the words hold a different meaning to those who are speaking/writing them, than to all those who are reading them. For example, ‘austerity’ means something very different to bankers than it does to workers in factories, or single-mothers on state-support. In effect, it is a method of attempting to translate political language into simple language. This is a great challenge in the economic and financial realm, for just when I feel I have reached a comfort level with being able to describe – in simple language – the meaning of a particular term or policy, a host of new words, policies, institutions and ideas emerge.

In truth, I imagine that if most economists were asked to provide a simple-language definition of many terms they are used to throwing about in academic or professional settings, they would struggle to find a way. I am not attempting to preach the baffle-gab nonsense of economic language, nor am I writing for economists. I am writing for people. I am writing for people who do not have the time or access to do the research that I am doing. And I am doing this because I think it is of the utmost importance that people gain a far more realistic understanding of the world we live in. These issues have profound implications for everyone on Earth; and yet, the substance, meaning and effects that these ideas and institutions have are left largely to being discussed within the realm of those who implement them. Analysis and criticism are focused on the ‘policies’, not the system itself. The discussions and debates that take place within the financial and economic world are spoken in foreign languages, and without a popular audience, without a popular understanding.

But people know things aren’t quite right. This book – and the People’s Book Project – aim to arm people with information, and to inspire action for change. But I can’t do this alone. I have to put in a lot of time and energy, and also – unfortunately – a good deal of money as well: subscriptions to the New York Times, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, The Banker and other publications do not come cheaply every month, but access to these sources – and their historical archives, where possible – is essential to my research. So what I am asking for in help from others, is largely to contribute to an ‘open-source subsidy’ to help me continue my research, and to write the first volume of the People’s Book Project. This means asking for donations. I hate asking money, really, it’s pretty much the least-enjoyable part of everything I spend my time on… but, it is also essential if I am to continue with my work.

I have thus decided to start a new fundraising campaign, aiming to raise $2,500 within the next couple weeks. Most of my previous attempts at fundraising fell far short of my goals, but admittedly, I did not do much follow-up in promoting them. Out of necessity, however, I must do so now. I will begin the count of money raised with including all the donations given to me in the past two weeks, amounting to $90, so that those who have donated in the past couple weeks know that their generous funds have gone to start a new campaign, instead of adding on to a previously-failed fundraising attempt.

If you do not have the financial resources to donate money, please help me out by promoting and sharing my fundraising campaign – and The People’s Book Project – with others: on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, message boards and other social media platforms. All of this help and support is necessary if I am to continue with this project, and all of our efforts combined truly make this the PEOPLE’s Book Project as opposed to simply ‘my’ book project.

Thank you very much for your time and support,

Andrew Gavin Marshall

fundraising

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7 Comments

  1. Martin Bélec says:

    Hi Gavin, I really like all the efforts you put in as a scholar to research the world as it is and expose it’s nervous system so ordinary people like me can see who’s controlling our collective brain. I donated a small amount to your project and wish you all the best. Will try and promote your work with my French speaking friends.

  2. Mike says:

    I am so excited. When can we expect the first volume and from which publisher?

    • Glad to hear. Well, I need a few months of absolute dedication to the book before i finish (and then I have some possible options for publishers, but have not signed anything with anyone), but to get that time, I first need the funds. So it’s all dependent upon that at the moment. Otherwise, I’ll have to turn to other work for the time being. So, hopefully soon! Cheers

  3. David Strickland says:

    Really excited about what you have going on. I plan on donating soon after I scrape up a few dollars to pay some bills. I enjoy your research; however, I would like to read some of your personal ideas, ideas, an solutions to our problems. Any idea when we can see a release date?

    • Thanks very much! And I’ll have some of my own thoughts in there as well. However, dates are entirely dependent upon the time I can put into this, which is entirely dependent upon money. So if things go well, sooner than later!

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